VA Disability Benefits for Agent Orange & Parkinson’s Disease [Updated]

VA Disability Benefits for Agent Orange & Parkinson’s Disease [Updated]

Compensation for Agent Orange VA Disability Lawyers Kalamazoo, MIThe VA will presume that exposure to Agent Orange caused Parkinson’s disease if you served in the Republic of Vietnam between January 9, 1962 and May 7, 1975.

If your claim for Parkinson’s disease has been denied, request a free case evaluation with one of our VA disability lawyers. We are here to help you with any legal issues you may have.

They’ll be able to walk you through the steps of proving your diagnosis is connected to your military service. Contact our office today if you have any additional questions or concerns about our VA disability services.

Continue reading to learn:

  • What is Agent Orange?
  • What is Parkinson’s disease?
  • Do I have to prove my service and Parkinson’s disease are connected?
  • What if my disability rating isn’t high enough?

What is Agent Orange?

Agent Orange was a powerful herbicide used by the United States during the Vietnam War to destroy agriculture and forest cover in Vietnam and Korea. However, this military tactic came at a great cost, causing irreversible illness and genetic damage in those exposed to Agent Orange.

Some of the illnesses associated with Agent Orange exposure include leukemia, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, various types of cancer, and Parkinson’s disease. Also, children of veterans exposed to Agent Orange can have severe birth defects and deformities that affect their quality of life.

What is Parkinson’s disease?

Parkinson’s disease is a degenerative brain disorder that affects a person’s ability to move through the world and live independently.

People with Parkinson’s disease usually experience the following symptoms:

  • Stiffness
  • Shaking
  • Tremors in hands or throughout body
  • Difficulty walking
  • Impaired balance
  • Impaired coordination

Do I have to prove my service and Parkinson’s disease are connected?

No, the VA presumes a connection between Agent Orange exposure and Parkinson’s disease if you served in the Republic of Vietnam between January 9, 1962 and May 7, 1975. Keep in mind that you may still be eligible for Agent Orange compensation if you served during different dates.

The VA may pay benefits if you:

  • Served in the Korean Demilitarized Zone between April 1, 1968 and August 31, 1971
  • Served in Thailand between February 28, 1961 and May 7, 1975
  • Operated, maintained, or served onboard C-123 aircraft between 1969 and 1986
  • Served outside Vietnam, but directly handled Agent Orange

President George H.W. Bush signed the Agent Orange Act into law in 1991. This act made it mandatory to presume a service connection between veterans’ Agent Orange exposure and certain diseases. This helped codify the VA’s response to veterans filing claims for Parkinson’s disease.

What if my disability rating isn’t high enough?

The higher your disability rating, the more Agent Orange compensation you’ll receive from the VA. This is why it’s important you’re given an appropriate rating that reflects how much Parkinson’s disease affects your ability to work and quality of life. If your disability rating from the VA is too low, request an appointment with one of our veterans attorneys. They’ll be able to help you collect and present the evidence you need to appeal the VA’s decision.

A lot of veterans don’t realize they can receive compensation for secondary disabilities, which are caused or worsened by service-connected conditions. For example, you may compensate for an injured leg by using the other leg more. Over time, the extra stress on your healthy leg can lead to injuries. Likewise, veterans with Parkinson’s disease are more likely to develop cardiovascular problems and other secondary conditions.

Our attorneys know that filing a claim for secondary disabilities can help raise your overall rating. Schedule an appointment with our law firm today to get started!

Our VA disability lawyers in Kalamazoo, MI have years of experience working with veterans and their families. To request a free case evaluation, call the VA Disability Group at (844) VET-LAWS.